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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rovers TCV - a design study viewing the 45 replacement - was the most significant unveiling and our number one car at Geneva.

This new face could help secure the company's long-term future when the TCV-inspired range goes on sale in 2004. In the absence of chief executive Kevin Howe - thought to be in China negotiating an agreement with Brilliance Holdings - Rovers new look was unveiled by deign director Peter Stevens.

The world's press was surprised when a team of dancers whipped a Union jack off the concept and then stuffed it into a washing machine in the boot, placed here to demonstrate the car's carrying capacity.

The new Rover drew crowds throughout the day, including many rival designers. One from Renault praised the step forward: "Rover has missed out a couple of generations and modernised in a single step." Others criticised "derivative" styling cues, noting the headlamp that were reminiscent of Vectra's in the next hall.

Will Rover's new look sell? The strong styling theme will no doubt attract a welcome batch of younger buyers. But most observers agreed that Rover has a long way to go to make younger buyers comfortable wit a switch from makes like Audi and ***. Meantime, the risk is Rover's loyal older customers will be put off.

Rover design chief Peter Stevens and his team of eight have created a look of huge presence, characterised by an aggressive grille, strong bonnet and dominant headlights. "This isn't exactly a car that we would produce, but it is very close to the whole design language that we'll be using in future," says Stevens. Based on a 75 platform, the 4.5m TCV has a surprisingly long wheelbase. This allows for a spacious cabin while the concept's Relatively high roof adds a good-sized boot, despite, the short rear overhang.

Show goers puzzled by the choice of a washing machine to demonstrate the boot's capacious size - the usual object is a more aspiration item like a mountain bike - should know that the carpet trim fell short of the required standard and had to be covered up with a large item.
The raised ride height - 30mm higher tan a typical road car - suggests a four wheel drive crossover type vehicle, but this s red herring.
Any future Rover can't be four wheel drive because under the deal which Ford bought Land Rover precludes building a 4x4.

By Juian Rendell.
 
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
And the motoring press said that about the P6, it wouldn't attract it's core customers.

The P6 sold 350,000 cars during it's production run.

You wonder what would inspire a motoring journalist now and it seems to me they get their technial know-how from the Ladybird Book of Cars.
 

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Longbridge !
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3,306 Posts

The raised ride height - 30mm higher tan a typical road car - suggests a four wheel drive crossover type vehicle, but this s red herring.
Any future Rover can't be four wheel drive because under the deal which Ford bought Land Rover precludes building a 4x4.
Is that true ?
If so why are Rover looking into the possibility of a 75 SUV 4x4 vehicle ?
 

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the voice of reason!!!
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12,407 Posts
For every legal restriction there seems to be more than one loophole.
It's only a matter of time IMHO.
 

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Hows about China Brilliance manufacturing the four-wheel-drive version in China, and exporting it to the UK? After all, MGR won't be the ones building it now, will they? Even if it ends up entirely as an MGR product - badged, engined and everything, if MGR don't do the total manufacturing themselves, then I think we have found our loophole.
:cool:
 
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